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Is this really true ? I plan to test this assumption. For most of my life I have worked with computers, since the beginning of the sixties. The old IBM machines we worked with often needed special attention, like actual manual manipulating. Later main frames, system development, programming, big main frame conversions, IBM and VAX machines, all languages, up to creating the first ADABAS/NATURAL fourth-gen language systems. My job. Then following the laptops, all Windows systems, starting with the Windows 1, later XP (my favorite), then installing the 7, now Windows 10. Piece of cake installing and converting from one to the next. In between, adding one Apple iPad. Just working with devices of course cannot prevent dementia in later life. On the contrary. Versatility of feeding your brain, thinking for yourself, overloading yourself with not just stereotype Internet junk, and spoon-fed dictionaries. Versatility for me includes also reading a book, writing and publishing on the Internet, playing chess daily, and never relying on anybody else to do any thinking for me. The best ‘brain-food’ is languages, preferably more than just one (or as we always say: English, Irish and Rubbish). Plus, travel comes cheaper when speaking the language of the guest country.

To retain memory function, why not try remember all international phone numbers, all passwords without ever once having to look it up. That’s what I do. In other words, practice your brain like doing physical exercise (mine is swimming, and cycling and walking). Next year will be my eightieth. Hoping for myself to still have a nice healthy and well-functioning brain.

From the Mayo Clinic:”dementia describes a group of symptoms affecting memory, thinking and social abilities severely enough to interfere with daily functioning. Typically, dementia is always assigned to “the elderly”. Those whose memory often goes back over seventy years. [Remember: “A victim never forgets.”]. The dementia described by the Mayo Clinic, however, fits almost 100 % of most young people. Texting on their devices, pulling down dictionaries to complete entire phrases without ever having to think for themselves, or addling their brains with drugs. Good luck to you all !

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Travel medical insurance – how to get better deals. Usually and in general travel emergency insurance is more expensive when purchased in North America before going on a trip – let’s say to Europe. I suspect that this is caused by high third party liability provisions, when something goes wrong (in other words legal action). For my international travels I purchased all my insurances online. They are large insurers, but come with a price. When in Europe and an insurance case arises while out of country I experienced the biggest frustration not so much with the insurance coverage, but with the inability to contact the emergency phone numbers for such cases. And this has nothing to do with the mobile phone technology used to get through to wherever these insurances have their headquarters (usually somewhere in USA, Canada or out in virtual space). When an emergency arises and you are somewhere in Europe or in North Africa, or (God forbid in Timbouktou) and must rely on a mobile phone, no such luck to get through to an insurance who – in the worst case – gave you an international “call collect” number. Examples: Travel Guard. I had bought expensive coverage. When in Berlin on one occasion I needed to contact their emergency number. Of course at a time when they (in that case in Canada) are reachable during their office hours. It should be noted at this point, that when anywhere in Europe and renting a temporary vacation home the only phone one has is a mobile (cell) phone, even if you rent for several months. That is expensive in terms of air time. The person at that Travel Guard insurance who is on call took his sweet time to respond. In fact this particular incident I never got anybody to answer my call, only some music playing. That cost me 20. Forget it ! Subsequently cancelled this  insurance, requesting a full refund. Then bought an insurance in Germany for the remaining several months stay, same or better coverage, for 130 (instead of the initial C$2,000).  For several trips within Europe and North Africa I then bought a travel emergency medical insurance with a trip package (examples: one month Tunisia, one month Morocco), insurance per one month trip only around 100. Another example: Pacific Blue Cross, head quartered Vancouver, BC. Gives you a collect number to call (within 72 hours of an emergency). Some online travel insurances provide an “international toll free number”. Do not expect to be operational in any country where the mobile phone provider has overriding airtime authority. Check out this one, sold in North America and offering world-wide toll free numbers [ http://infomarket.avoxi.com/International-Toll-Free-Numbers.html? ]. This is a ‘cloud communications’ provider. Of course, enough customers may fall for this, order this package, subscribe to it, then arrive overseas and discover the pitfalls. Remember, CEO and founder David Wise is in South Carolina, possibly never visited any country to test his system for functionality. When in Europe a visitor must abide to the federal or local rules of mobile providers of the country visited. International toll free numbers work in North America and Mexico. Worst contact phone number that any business or your Bank can give you prior to travel are “call collect” numbers. By the time I am through an automated answering system (in Canada) my mobile phone service times out.

My advice: Buy travel medical emergency insurance from within the country you visit. Or else, do not buy any, pay a doctor or clinic, usually way cheaper than anywhere in North America. I never had any problems with any European travel insurance provider. You can usually trust them.

 

Why I support organizations like the World Wildlife Fund is simply because I was surrounded by wildlife for so many years . I lived by myself in the Kananaskis Country of Alberta and later in the Foothills of the Rocky Mountains for over twenty seven years. With my horses and cats to keep me company. Before arriving in Canada – from the United States – in 1976, I had lived in cities, mostly Europe. I also did not have the luxury of growing up in a “Huckleberry Finn kind of childhood”, like Monte Hummel, President Emeritus & Chair, Legacy Giving, World Wildlife Fund. On the contrary, when I was two years old, World War II had started in Europe, and our country during the bombardments in the years 1940 until 1945 was completely destroyed. Not the kind of childhood one likes to remember, but must. Being in Canada and reminded of the war regularly.

Not long ago I received a book from Monte Hummel titled Wintergreen, Reflections from Loon Lake. I did not even know where Look Lake is: “Loon Lake is a resort and vacation/retirement community off Highway 97 just north of Cache Creek in British Columbia, Canada.” In it, he wrote: “To Renata Sch., I hope this little book reminds you of an important place in your life.” [signed: Monte Hummel]. It sure does, to me always Alberta comes to mind, although since 2002 I have resided in British Columbia. The memories of Alberta and my animals are so strong that I even have ‘AB with a banner and the wild rose’ tattooed on my leg, together with a horse, and a dream catcher. Among others.
My large piece of land in the foothills was bordered by miles of Crown Land. My nearest neighbor almost a mile. To get groceries I had to drive with my truck into town, one hour. In winter the snow was at times five feet high and trees down. I always had to take my chain saw with me and cut myself out of my place, to even get anywhere. Of course, being alone has also its draw backs, many accidents, no medical services anywhere. I survived !
In winter, my resident moose cow came by, she always had her calf near my home. Lots of white tail deer abound. We also had the occasional wolf, bear, and cougar. The grizzly bear, dangerous. I recall a particular incident when I had to drive though the bush with my 4-wheel drive truck to the little saw mill to pick up lumber for my fences. Arriving at the site, I did not see the usually present lumberjack. All was deserted. The only thing I noticed was a yellow wildlife service tape strung around the trees, KEEP OUT sign. Grizzly Bear. In fact, a Grizz had taken down a cow and the fresh kill was still there. On my way up to the saw mill I had also met another truck with two guys – white in their face – leaving at high speed from the opposite direction.
Many times in winter and summer I rode alone with my horse, through bear country. Important is, to make some kind of noise, if it’s only singing. I never had any bear spray on my. Useless anyways. In the high country, when I see fresh bear scat on the trail in the bush, I quietly get out and on my way, return to where I came from. Reason is, that my horse can easily get scared, dumping me. Not a good idea, with a large animal that is scared of a mouse.
One such incident in the Kananaskis: A lady rider with her horse, running into a cougar, the horse bolted, turned and she was thrown. The cougar – being a cat – then jumped the horse and injured the poor animal seriously. I saw the horse later in the barn. The rider had been lucky.
I also had a cougar den at the other end of my property – half a mile down – where I had done some logging. With my horse, I just get out of the way.
Smaller animals, we had plenty. Including a visitor who arrived at my house and played on my porch one winter, a snow white weasel, beautiful creature
[ http://www.aitc.sk.ca/saskschools/animals/weasel.htmla ], not shy at all. And in my large pond a family of musk rats. My duck family returned annually in spring to have their babies on my pond. Usually they have seven, which is typical I suppose. Where they hang out in winter, I do not know. At this elevation, snow usually started around Thanksgiving in October, and often stayed until beginning of June.
What I learned about wildlife is, no wild animal is really dangerous or harms you, if you treat it right and with respect.

As travel as a pastime, entertainment and necessity has become one the biggest ticket items sold and bought on the Internet, particular by a large seniors’ population, who incidentally require more than anybody else PEACE OF MIND (Oh my God, maybe I suffer a stroke while enjoying myself in a foreign country !), Insurance companies are advertising and selling at all cost and pressurising travelers to buy travel insurance. Sell at all cost, make as an agent your (who knows) 40% commission, but under no circumstances provide the most needed coverage to some poor sod who happens to have travelled out of country. Is travel insurance then useless ? unwanted ? not needed ? not necessary ? I would say so. Today when everything is bought and sold online, how do insurances make money ? They make money on the people who never use it. [ quoted from http://viewfromthewing.boardingarea.com/2013/05/24/the-travel-insurance-scam-read-this-post-before-you-book-your-next-trip/ ].
Point in case: Travel to Europe. Spend several months. Before leaving, buy some travel insurance package, including cancellation insurance, emergency medical insurance, delayed or lost baggage. The insurance company will provide an emergency phone number for the traveller. As you know, in Europe almost no one uses any landline phone, everybody is on a mobile phone (or as we call it: cell phone). Meaning expensive air time and roaming charges. When calling from Europe to North America, where these insurance agents physically reside, nothing but problems with their CALL COLLECT or TOLL FREE phone number (that would only work in North America). Call Collect works in misterious ways. A traveler has a medical emergency and needs to phone the insurance within 72 hours of that incident. If that person ends up in a hospital, a payment out front must be made (give me your credit card!). If that poor traveler is unconscious, he or she will most probably lie in some corner in the hospital, never waking up. Meanwhile the period of 72 hours to call the Travel Insurance overseas, has passed, and the policy is invalid. My recent case: I just spend three months in the South of France, using my cell phone with a French SIM card, that when used costs me a fortune, even if I would ever reach some call collect number. It would be an anwering machine, and waiting times at least ten minutes, costing from Europe like €20 at least. No matter, what kind of contact number the insurance gives you, there are still air time and roaming charges. Call Collect always costs the caller. [ http://www.howtocallabroad.com/qa/toll-free.html ] While international “Toll Free” numbers may work for the insurance company who sells them (usually residing North America), but not for the international traveler who tries to use them. All those (emergency call) numbers offered by North American insurance companies are foremost controlled by the country where a traveler currently resides.
Before leaving I had bought at Pacific Blue Cross $878 travel insurance for three months to cover emergency medical, and cancellation. When I needed them, using their Medi Assist call collect number, no contact, no way to reach them, my service provider hung up. Meanwhile I could have used a small amount (like not more than €50 to pay for a Doctor or Pharmacy). For the Pacific Blue Cross I tested their phone numbers after my return, typical wait times were way over ten minutes. The travel insurance industry has figured out that according to statistics – comparing insurances sold and emergencies covered – it has become extremely profitable to sell travel medical emergency insurance.
As mentioned before, insurances make money on the people who never use it. BTW – delayed or lost baggage is covered by the airlines.

2015/2016 logistics of how to get to Nice Airport from Cannes for early flights. Nice is the third busiest airport in France (after Paris CDG and Orly). Nice Airport [ http://www.nice.aeroport.fr ]. It has two terminals, T1 and T2. Most domestic flights are using Terminal 1. Most international flights are from Terminal 2. For some time now and at present, there are road constructions around the Airport which make it difficult to commute there, or even walk to the Airport. Between Cannes and Nice, there are several buses (Lignes d’Azur yellow), of which Bus 210 is an express to and from the Airport. Starting at 7 AM in Cannes, at Hotel de Ville, arrival Nice Airport Terminal 1 at 7:50 AM. €20 one way. For early flights, useless. If the flight is scheduled to leave 7 AM, then the time needed to arrive at the airport is preferably not later then 5 AM. Because, since after the November 13th terror attacks in Paris, Nice Airport Security has installed more severe check-in measures.
Other options, of which the least preferred: (1) Taxi cab from Cannes. Costs can amount to €120 for early cabs (4 AM and two suit cases). Plus wherever you live a walk to Hotel de Ville Plaza where cabs normally are. Or pay even more to order Taxi services to the door. (2) Train, TER PACA [ http://www.ter.sncf.com/paca ]. Which would be very cheap, but again the first trains leaving Cannes are still too late. The earliest being the train Mandelieu-La-Nepoule via Cannes to Ventimiglia. Cannes stop around 5:20 AM, arriving the stop closest to Nice Airport at 5:50 AM (Nice-St-Augustin). Too late for 7 AM flights.
NOTE. For later flights, this last option is ideal: take the train to the stop just before Nice Center, get out, then walk to the Airport. Walking now takes longer then 20 minutes, because of the extensive road constructions. Airport signs everywhere, easy not to get lost. Plus, there is also a free Airport Shuttle (Navette) service every 10 minutes, which circles around the entire airport area and between Terminal 1 and 2.
My option: I booked an Airport Hotel for the night before the flight. My flight is at Terminal 2 at 7 AM. The day before I have lots of time in the afternoon to take the train to Nice-St-Augustin stop, walk to the airport hotel, which is a 10 minute walk to Terminal 1. The morning of the flight, early walk to the Airport. Budget hotels running around €55 a night.
Documentation: (a) Plan du Réseau Les Transports des Pays de Lérins. (b)
Aéroport Nice Côte D’Azur Horaires/Timetable brochure which lists all flights, airlines, and a host of other important information (free at Airport). Balcon d'Azur 007

Spending couple of months in Cannes, la Côte d’Azur, the wonderful warm Mediterranean Cost line of the South of France. Arriving 9 November 2015.

How to get here from North America

Nearest airport is Nice. Most North American flights go via Paris, major airport Charles de Gaulle (CDG), arrival Terminal 2E. In my case, flying Air France/KLM, I needed to take off for Nice from the second big airport in Paris – Orly. As CDG airport is very large, it takes some time to navigate to where the shuttle bus takes off for Orly Airport. Cost €21. As with most bus services, buy a ticket from an agent, not on the bus. Time to circumvent almost all of Paris to arrive at Orly is around 45 minutes. Arrival Nice – a short flight only – Terminal 2. From there an express shuttle train gets to Terminal 1, where the Express Bus #210 to Cannes takes off. Again, buy ticket inside the terminal, not from driver. Cost €20 one way. Time around 40 minutes.

Luggage delayed

I was late getting out of Nice airport, as my checked-in suit case had been left behind in Paris CDG airport. Reason: because I changed airports. Should have picked up my suit case at the carousel at CDG, Paris. However, the Canada Vancouver Airport agent had told me, the luggage goes thru to Nice. Spending some time with the Air France luggage services, which is inside a closed off secure area at Nice Airport. Made a report at Nice Airport. Then took the #210 bus to Cannes.

Mobile Phone

Had my old Motorola W370 (Rogers) cell phone unblocked in Canada. Bought a SIM carte for the largest phone network Orange at Nice Airport. This is the Orange holiday 120 minutes, 1000 texts + 1GB; 39.99. Easy. With the SIM comes a package with instructions for activation. [www.orange.fr]. The number you get has some zeros somewhere, in France use only the number; outside plus 0033 (France), or elsewhere in Europe 00(country code), then number.
Top up coupon Mobicarte available anywhere from super market, newsstand, or Orange agent. Same as in Canada. I buy €25 and get €8 bonus, for example. Recently changed my Orange SIM for another – La Post Mobile, they start €9.99, gives you so many minutes, and messages. Cheapest are messages, calls expensive. Across the border from France to Italy, my cell phone network stops, Orange will switch to some Italian network, La Poste Mobile, not.

Food, Groceries, Markets

Compared to our Canadian prices, regular food items are cheaper. Because we import all the good things. Therefore, it is always a good idea to rent a place with a small kitchen. Find a super market somewhere. Here in Cannes there are several large open air markets daily from early to noon, for all foods and flowers. I found – because of the late season, November – I was better off to buy in the super market, as fresh markets are more expensive. Super markets not much choice in fresh fruits, vegetables.
Wines are also very cheap, can buy in any super market. Don’t forget bring your own bags. No plastic bags free.

Restaurants, Cafes

Comparable, can be expensive, because of the service cost. In four months in Europe I maybe go once into a restaurant. I cook my own meals. Here it is common to eat out lunch in a restaurant, lots of seafood. Cafe is different. Being so close to Italy, fine caffees are standard, a tiny espresso cost €1.40, cappuccino cost around €3.50.
Cafe/brasserie during the day culture, watch out as a single woman. Mostly men sitting around, lots of smokers (though confined to outside, but still). Wait your sweet time for service. I wait 8 minutes, then leave. Yesterday, went to another Cafe, in French ask them if they serve women and tourists. This server came over so quick. All prices in Europe including taxes !

Transportation

Cannes has a good public transportation system: the Palm Bus. [palmbus.fr]  Network plans, individual line plans with times and variety of schedules available also at Palm Bus sales centres, City center, and tourist information. Buses cover the entire region of Cannes and outlying other towns. It is a vaste network, extending over an area of multiple hours travel time. Cost one trip (which incl. transfers) €1.30; ticket of ten cost €10. Useful about the individual schedules is that they can also serve as area maps and plans. As the regular (online) and available here ‘circuit pédestre’ plan is not all inclusive and detailed enough. Most useful is the big Palm Bus map ‘plan du réseau’ showing all bus lines and lots of information. Then the trains (SNCF train station city centre) best of all, get you anywhere fast. [TERpaca.fr; TER=Transport Express Regional). As I rent near the historical Centre Le Suquet, the center, La Croisette, most shopping areas are easily reachable by foot.

Most important the connections between Cannes and Nice Airport

How to get to Nice if your flight from Nice Airport is too early for the regular Express bus from Cannes ?  Taxi from Cannes ?  Not for me, I avoid taxis wherever I am (despite no language problem whatsoever).  Taxi one way Cannes to Nice Airport at least EUR90. Better : SNCF train Cannes train station earliest train 05:17,  stops Nice St Augustine station, very near to the airport (500m).  Then Taxi. $10 train, plus Taxi. Not so bad ! More on Nice [ http://wikitravel.org/en/Nice ]. Link to a comprehensive website [ http://www.seat61.com/Europe-train-travel.htm#Do_I_need_to_check-in_for_a_train ] about all sorts of trains and many practical tips. WRONG is: “tickets will be checked on the train.” Not so.Throughout the SNCF France region (or even elsewhere), before boarding the train, the ticket must be validated in a small machine, which prints the leaving train station and the time of day. Ad-hoc controls on the train (in 2 months only once).

Swimming Pools

For me important. During winter season, most public indoor pools are closed, except La Piscine at Parc Montfleury. It is a large, bright pool with five double (25m) swim lanes, a shallow warm pool and one for small kids. No chlorinated water. Single admission €5.10, also reduced rates. Lockers cost extra. This is a mixed pool for men and women, also in the dressing areas and showers. Life guards on duty. These pools are operated by the City of Cannes. Extremely clean. The Parc Montfleury is also known for its six outdoor tennis courts.

Shopping

The entire length of Cannes and surroundings parallel to the Mediterranean is one big shopping area. With Boulevard La Croisette, and the Rue d’Antibes famous for its many high class and luxury items’ stores. As is Rue Felix Faure. With Rue Meynardier and its narrow historical streets offering the lower priced items.

Safety, Security

Since the terrorist attacks November 13, 2015 in Paris  – not safe anywhere anymore, in Europe or particularly France. I would not go out after dark, not even to the super market. Although Cannes is pretty safe and street lighting everywhere. Just, not hang out anywhere where large numbers of people are. Police and armed Military mainly around train stations, airports, and boulevards with large numbers of holiday shoppers. My next train trip will be from Cannes to Marseille, only a two hour ride.

Seems to be quite common with major cruise ship lines that their big ocean cruisers are infected with outbreaks of the Norovirus. The latest incident: Star Princess sailing from Vancouver on September 19th, 2015 to several Hawaii Islands’ locations, then returning back to Vanvouver arriving Cruise Ship Terminal on October 4h, 2015. Of multiple posts on this particular voyage, this strikes me
[ http://www.cruiselawnews.com/articles/norovirus/ ] as underestimating the severity of a particularly nasty outbreak of respiratory and gastrointestinal disease on the Star Princess. Since I was on this same ship, here is the real story:
My cruise had been sold to me by Expedia CruiseshipCenters. These are experienced cruising experts who have access to all the necessary information sources to make their customers aware of a cruise line’s history of such outbreaks. And there is a history for this particular Princess Cruises’ ship. Soon after embarkation at Vancouver a number of passengers started coughing – the kind of cough that brings up your lungs. I had a balcony, my neighbor to my left was the first to cough. Couple of days later, my neighbor to the right of me started. Then more and more passengers got sick. What they gave them in the Sick Bay ? Tamiflu. This is a viral outbreak, possibly already arriving with the Star Princess from a previous voyage. I complained officially at the Customer Services Desk, request that I like to use my balcony without being coughed at by both sides. No reaction. Throughout this voyage a very large number of guests fell quite ill. Dining rooms started empty out.
On 27 September the first health advisory report was issued by Dr. Grant Tarling, Chief Medical Officer, referring to (simple) cold and fly symptoms,and giving out advice how to protect yourself. In addition to the hundreds of (Alcohol-based) hand sanitizing stations throughout the ship. On 30 September 2015 the second health advisory report was issued to all guests, strongly suggesting an outbreak of novorvirus.
[ http://www.cdc.gov/norovirus/about/overview.html ]. Measures were put in place to protect open food buffets, allowing the crew to handle foods with gloves.
On the ship throughout the voyage I was not sick. Arriving back in Vancouver and spending many hours by bus and ferry to finally return home, I was still OK. Until the next day, that nasty virus got hold of me. This type of virus is difficult to fight, because is is the immune system that needs to take care of it, as well as the most important prevention measures – cleanliness. Sanitation.
Question remains: Why cruise ship service agents are selling cruises for ships that are well known to have had multiple outbreaks of this norovirus in the recent past.
My observations on this ship: Guests were still coughing into their hands, using the Internet room and touching keyboards, or coughing freely into the air surrounding them. Or seafood and fruits being served which might or might not have been infected. Because of the fact that the disease started immediately upon embarkation, it can be strongly suspected that the Norovirus was already present when the voyage started. From a financial point of view, it is bad business to purchase a cruise for around $5,000 which includes not only a nice cabin with balcony, food, swimming pools, entertainment of all sorts, but also (hidden) a dangerous viral infestation.

{BTW – I never had any esperience like this in my life.} Rules of the Centers for Disease Control & Prevention:[ http://www.cdc.gov/nceh/vsp/surv/gilist.htm ]

Why Travel Alone

Because travel alone is often to one’s advantage. There usually is no distraction by travel companions and groups. Local culture can be more appreciated and people can be met easier. In other words: the traveler learns more. Secondly, as a single traveler I can often get much better deals, be it transportation or markets, or anything else I need. I see it again and again when observing tourists talking among themselves, in their own language I might add, being little aware of the local architecture and surrounding. I like to talk to locals. A big help is foreign languages’ knowledge. I learned a lot. I made friends when I traveled, and often stayed in touch after we parted. Immersing yourself in local culture is a rewarding and wonderful experience. Except, today we live in a different world. This type of approach can easily become a hazard to one’s safety. For example, I have spent a couple of months in North Africa, The Maghreb. I speak French, that helps. Today, I would be very careful and recline voyages to certain countries. Russia, Saint Petersburg, one of the most beautiful and culture-rich cities in the world. Possible to go alone. Most Russians are friendly people, most speak at least German. Or as I noticed many years ago when travelling (former) Yugoslavia, in the hotels also French was spoken. In the country, at that time, I had more problems, despite my Serbo-Croatien dictionary, most women on the train I had taken out of Zagreb, did not read. That was then. Today, with so many displaced people around the world, one does not know anymore in which country one is. Including my own home country in Europe. There I am a foreigner, while others like Africans, Balkan, or Middle East, Indians or from anywhere else, are the natives of my former home land. [Verkehrte Welt !]

This year 2015, it is exactly fifty years ago that I had left my Homeland. In fact, there is no Home- Land, because during WWII it has been completely destroyed. Now rebuilt to certain (more or less historic) standards, some like it – mostly tourists – others know that all rebuilding cannot recover any cities to what they were. Old historic cities dating back to many centuries ago. But more than that, it is not only buildings that make a country, a nation, a homeland, or a town. It is the people. Since WWII, which ended May 1945, not many who survived the war (like I did from start 1939 to end 1945) are still alive today. I was very young during the years of bombings, but still remember. Today’s population in my homeland are so different, mainly because they arrived from many countries to settle down. You could say: “we build it, and they come”.
The rebuilding – mostly in the beginning removing rubble – after 1945 re-started slowly and picking up pace, the first years single handedly done by women. Since there were not many men, they had perished at the Russian Front. The few civilians that were left after the many years of Allied bombings (killing off most of them), had to do the hard work. Now, after forty years in North America, I still do not consider where I am now, my HomeLand. I have no HomeLand.

International humanitarian law is based on three key principles.
• Distinction. All sides must distinguish between military targets and civilians. Any deliberate attack on a civilian or civilian building – such as homes, medical facilities, schools or government buildings – is a war crime (providing the building has not been taken over for military use). If there is any doubt as to whether a target is civilian or military, then it must be presumed to be civilian.
• Proportionality. Civilian causalities and damage to civilian buildings must not be excessive in relation to the expected military gain.
• Precaution. All sides must take precautions to protect civilians.
Amnesty International was founded in London in 1961 that is long after World War II. During which millions of civilians were deliberately killed and entire countries destroyed. [‘Barbed wire around a small lighted candle’ being the symbol of Amnesty International.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/File:Amnesty_International_logo.svg ]
How does that look now ? In the light of the more recent wars, which it must be said are also conducted by the same nations (formerly called: The Allies – Britain, America and Canada), joined by other nations, which formerly had been occupied during WWII, nothing much has changed.
What was the military gain expected by totally destroying our home land ? by killing unarmed women and small children ? Protect civilians, how ? When the Allied tanks rolled into my home town which had been fire bombed for 4 years and left destroyed, first order of business was to erect barbed wire fences around our part of town, and set up their camp across in our city park. Afraid, that we small children were carrying guns and shoot at them ? That was probably the reason that when we went over looking for food that the fat American cook chased us out by setting his killer dogs at our heels.
So, I am asking Amnesty International to not knock at my door and ask for donations.
Food for thought: [ http://www.amnestyusa.org/our-work/countries/middle-east-and-north-africa/syria ], which armed forces are using Barrel Bombs ?? [ https://www.whitehelmets.org/ ]